Announcements

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December 4, 2018

Brief report on the History of Emotions Symposium at the University of Helsinki, 7-8 November, 2018, by William M. Reddy:

On November 7 and 8, I was present in Helsinki for a History of Emotions Symposium co-sponsored by the Center of Excellence in Ancient Near Eastern Empires, University of Helsinki, the Academy of Finland, and Aalto University. The program is here: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/conferences/history-of-emotions-symposium . The two main organizers were Ancient Near Eastern specialist Saana Svärd of the University of Helsinki and neuroscientist Mikko Sams of Aalto University. The symposium was held to introduce a project by the above-mentioned Center of Excellence to make a systematic study of emotional expression in cuneiform texts in the Akkadian language.

In two days, we made a rapid review of research trends in related fields, ending with a paper introducing the Akkadian Emotions project. Heini Saarimäki of Aalto University gave an overview of neuroscientific research on emotions, including efforts to use brain imaging to understand both narratives and conversations (rather than just static images or printed words). Very interesting work along these lines is currently under way in Aalto. There were papers by Krista Lagus and Jussi Pakkasvirta (both of Helsinki University) on the use of emotional expressions in present-day Finnish social media. Ville Vuolanto (Tampere University) and Andrew Crislip (Virginia Commonwealth University and University of Helsinki) gave papers on emotions during the Roman period. Crislip’s paper, which focused on Christian emotions prior to the fourth century CE was particularly informative to me, making clear how much of a break was represented by the fourth-century Fathers such as Jerome and Augustine. Prior to 350 CE, Stoic norms and even the idea that Christians should be happy were commonly embraced in Christian writings.

Ulrike Steinert of Gutenberg University, Mainz, provided a fascinating introduction to ancient Mesopotamian ideas of selfhood. Finally, the Helsinki team of Tero Alstola, Heidi Jauhiainen, Aleksi Sahala, and Krister Lindén introduced us to the Akkadian Emotions project, which aims at working out semantic fields for several dozen key Akkadian words.

The day following the symposium, I was very fortunate to be invited by Mikko Sams to his lab at Aalto University, where I had conversations with several of his graduate students and postdocs about their projects. Sams and his associates are acutely aware of the potential impact of historical and cultural variation on participants’ responses to different test designs, and thus on the historical contingency of imaging results. Sams believes neuroscientists should be listening carefully to anthropologists and historians as a result. I was impressed by the care and effort which a well executed imaging study necessarily entails; as with a dissertation in history, there is, after a lot of work, some things that are sure and a larger cloud of uncertainties and educated guess work.

November 28, 2018

Call for Papers deadline for the Second Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions had been extended to Monday, December 10, 2018. Please check the SHE website for more details: https://societyhistoryemotions.com/she-conference-2019/

November 20, 2018

History of Psychology invites submissions for a special issue on the history of emotions in the modern period.

The relatively new specialization of the history of the emotions has revealed that emotion, felt experience, and expression have played a key role in culture, society, and politics. In the history of science, however, interest in the emotions has been more muted. This special issue will focus on the exploration of emotion theory and practice in the human sciences in the modern period – roughly from the late 18thcentury to today.

This special issue will address the following themes, among others. Was there a particular historical moment in which interest in emotions in the sciences, broadly construed, increased? While some historians situate heightened study of the emotions in the sciences in the 1960s, others point to a surge in interest in emotions after World War II. But we can also go back to William James’s 1884 influential theory of emotion that stimulated intense debate; or to the 1910s, when Walter Cannon experimented on the physiological concomitants of emotion; or to the early 1920s, when unorthodox psychoanalysts Sandor Ferenczi and Otto Rank raised emotional understanding to a central place in psychoanalysis. More recently, studies in the new discipline of social neuroscience have contributed to the ever-growing literature on emotion and the brain.

Can we discover the roots of the academy’s recent turn to the emotions in older traditions that have not yet received their due? Might historical investigations shed light on contemporary debates on emotion including the existence, or not, of a set of universal, basic emotions, or whether emotion is primarily a bodily affect or a cognitive response?

As the study of emotion has not been confined to any one discipline, we welcome submissions on the history of psychology, psychotherapy, neuroscience, psychophysiology, social work or other relevant fields.

The submission deadline is March 1, 2019.

The main text of each manuscript, exclusive of figures, tables, references, or appendices, should not exceed 35 double-spaced pages (approximately 7,500 words). Initial inquiries regarding the special issue may be sent to the guest editor, Susan Lanzoni <smlanzoni@gmail.com>or the regular editor, Nadine Weidman <hop.editor@icloud.com>.

Papers should be submitted through the History of Psychology Manuscript Submission Portal with a cover letter indicating that the paper is to be considered for the special issue. Please see the Instructions to Authors information located on the History of Psychology website.

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November 20, 2018

History of Experience: Theories, Methodologies, and Concepts

March 4 – 5, 2019
Tampere University, Finland

Please download the CFP of the first open international conference of HEX in PDF format here.

The concept of experience has played a major role in many classic works of history, as those of R.G. Collingwood and E.P. Thompson. Studying the experiences of people whose voice was often silenced became an empowering element in the new social history and in the history from below. This enterprise became heavily criticized in the post-structuralist thinking. Experience as simple or essentialist evidence in explaining history was challenged by many influential historians like Joan W. Scott. In Germany, on the other hand, the history of experiences (Erfahrungsgeschichte) answered the challenge of the cultural turn by taking Peter Berger’s and Thomas Luckmann’s sociology of knowledge (1966) as its point of departure in explaining experiences as social and linguistic constructions. Lately, studies in the history of emotions have made important contributions to enrich historical scholarship, mostly in a constructionist fashion.

The Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX), hosted by Tampere University, is seeking new ways to study experiences and their role in explaining history. HEX studies experiences as lived realities and focuses on three wide-ranging cultural and societal phenomena: lived religion, lived nation, and lived welfare state. HEX covers a great variety of historical approaches, both old and new, in studying experiences as a crucial element of social reality including structures, agency, identities, and emotions. We ask how people make their lives – and their society and history – through experiences. We are seeking for new insights and methodologies to the past. We are open to all ideas from all disciplines which enrich historical analysis of experience – and we aim to show how the history of experiences can also contribute to other disciplines.

The first open international conference of HEX will be held on March 4–5, 2019, in Tampere, Finland. The theme of the conference is History of Experience: Theories, Methodologies, and Concepts. Our keynote speakers are Professor Laura Lee Downs (European University Institute, Florence) and Professor Jan Plamper (Goldsmiths, University of London).

Professor Laura Lee Downs’ research interests cover modern Europe, gender history, history and social theory, and comparative labour history, among others. She is the founder and director of the EUI Gender project as well as the European research network The Quest for Welfare and Democracy. Her publications include the widely read Writing Gender History (2nd edition Bloomsbury 2010) and other books and articles on labour history, theories and methodologies of gender history and the history of childhood.

Professor Jan Plamper is a specialist on the history of emotions and experience in the 19th and 20th century Europe with a focus on Russian and Soviet history. His major publications are The Stalin Cult: A Study in the Alchemy of Power (Yale University Press, 2012) and The History of Emotions: An Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2015, German original 2012). He is currently studying the history of migration in post-1945 Germany and the experience of fear among Russian soldiers of the First World War.

We call for papers discussing topics such as:
• What is (historical) experience and how to study it?
• What are the theoretical frameworks for the history of experiences?
• What kind of methodologies and concepts it employs?
• How does the history of experience contribute to historical research at large?

Thus, the papers should focus on the theoretical, methodological, and conceptual dimensions of experience or fruitful cases illuminating these aspects. The discussion is not limited to any specific historical period or geographical area.

Please submit abstracts (approx. 250 words) for 20 minute paper presentations latest by December 20 at the website https://www.lyyti.in/historyofexperience2019_abstracts. Notifications of acceptance will be send by January 10, 2019. HEX will cover accommodation costs for the accepted participants.

For further details on HEX and the conference, please see http://research.uta.fi/hex.

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November 19, 2018

Conference on Emotions and Emotion Concepts

in Bern, 29th November – 1st December 2018

It is our pleasure to announce a three-day conference on Emotions and Emotion Concepts which will take place on Thursday, 29th November until Saturday, 1st December, 2018 at the University of Bern, Switzerland.

There is no registration fee. Everybody is welcome to attend. Please drop us a quick email if you wish to join us for this conference.

For a full conference program as well as further information about the conference, please visit the conference website: https://sites.google.com/view/emotions-in-bern

Keynote Speakers:

Michael Brady (University of Glasgow)
Olga Pollatos (University of Ulm)
Jesse Prinz (City University New York)
Katja Schlegel (University of Bern)
Fabrice Teroni (University of Geneva)

Christine Wilson-Mendenhall (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

This workshop is financed by the Swiss National Foundation (IZSEZ0_183757).

Organization: 

Rodrigo Díaz (University of Bern) rodrigo.diaz@philo.unibe.ch

Kevin Reuter (University of Bern) kevin.reuter@philo.unibe.ch

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November 14, 2018

International Journal of Fear Studies
Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Approaches

Call for Papers and Creative Submissions:

Dr. R. Michael Fisher, Ph.D., founder/editor of IJFS, has set the wheels in motion for a first edition of an on-line journal that promotes academic scholarship, professional explorations and popular educational and creative works for a variety of serious readers interested in fresh thinking and ideas about the nature and role of fear in societies. Articles and creative submissions may include large technical and philosophical works, research studies and results, essays, opinions, poetry and other art, etc.

There is also going to be space to share the kinds of work (theoretical or practical, complete or incomplete) you are doing on fear that deserves international recognition. The primary criteria is that works have an interdisciplinary and/or transdisciplinary approach, while at the same time are progressive and open-minded works that instigate insight, healing, liberation, creative thinking, critique, and synthesis. We simply require a new journal format like IJFS because there is no other place to focus on fear as a subject matter in any journal to date.

All authors retain their own copyright of their works published in IJFS. The journal will consider re-published submissions as long as copyright approval has been made. Submissions Due January 20, 2019 for the first volume edition of IFJS. Feel free to send the editor (r.michaelfisher52@gmail.com) a proposal of what you would like to submit ahead of time if you want feedback first. Otherwise, send your completed work and it will go out for peer-review and final editing by Dr. Fisher. Citations of references is essential in papers and should follow a standard style format (e.g., Chicago, APA, Harvard, etc.) in most cases, but also feel free to be creative in style format as well but provide a rationale for any such deviations from standard formats. There is no word-length requirements of submissions. If all goes well the first journal will be published in Spring 2019. There’ll likely be two issues/year.

If you would like to be on the Editorial Board (and/or be a Reviewer for IFJS) make your interest known to Dr. Fisher as soon as possible. We look forward to your participation to make this journal a success. The first edition will be available in an open-access pdf format and housed on the Fearlessness Movement ning (hosted by R. M. Fisher) and eventually, IFJS will be archived in a university library digital repository with open-access and full linking to academic search engines.

If you would like to gift a donation to IFJS, please contact R. M. Fisher. Your support is greatly appreciated.

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November 7, 2018

Call for Papers for ‘Emotions in Conflict’, the Second Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Emotions

Dates: 2‒4 October 2019
Venue: University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Committee: David Dean, Kathryn Prince, Piroska Nagy
Call for Papers Deadline: 1 December 2018
Enquiries/Submission of Proposals: conflict@vectorsofemotion.com

Conflict (whether interpersonal, intercultural, interspecies or individual) can lead to devastating consequences, but it is also an important catalyst for creativity and an indicator of social change. The emotions associated with conflict can be as pleasurable as the relish of dramatic tension or as devastating as a complete physical and mental collapse of the self.

We invite participants to consider the emotions associated with conflict, to examine how various cultures have understood the nexus of emotions and conflict, and to explore conflicting emotions in any context. Approaches from all disciplines broadly related to the History of Emotions are welcome. Given uOttawa’s bilingual mission, participation in French is welcome and encouraged. A version of the call for papers is also available en français. The deadline is 1 December 2018 to submit proposals (in English or French) for individual papers, panels, and creative presentations (200–300 words with a short biographical statement) to the conference organisers David Dean, Kathryn Prince and Piroska Nagy at the conference address: conflict@vectorsofemotion.com

The conference will take place at uOttawa, located downtown near Ottawa’s many galleries and museums, the Rideau Canal, and other attractions, including a shuttle to see the autumn colours in Gatineau Park.

Download CFP flyer (ENG)

Download CFP flyer (FR)

Key Dates
  • 1 December 2018: Deadline for proposals
  • 15 January 2019: Decisions announced about proposals, along with information about hotel options and registration.
Conference Committee
  • David Dean, Director, Centre for Public History, Carleton University, Ottawa
  • Kathryn Prince, Department of Theatre, University of Ottawa
  • Piroska Nagy, Professor of Medieval History, Université du Québec à Montréal

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November 6, 2018

Do We Know What Work Feels Like?

Affective Forecasting in Performance Contexts

Seth Kaplan

George Mason University

Department of Psychology

Skaplan1@gmu.edu

I study the subjective experience of work with a focus on the affective/ emotional parts of that experience. One topic of interest concerns how affect/emotions impact workplace behavior, including performance of job activities (i.e., job performance). Research from our field shows that generalized affect and discrete emotions have statistically significant, but generally modest relationships, with various aspects of job performance such as task performance, counterproductive work behaviors, and safety behaviors.1

Perhaps explaining these modest effect sizes, recent research from social psychology suggests that the impact of affective states on behavior is rarely direct. Rather, affect and emotion function in a more distal and temporally delayed manner.2 That is, forecasts about prospective states (i.e., affective forecasts) guide subsequent action.

Juxtaposed with this research are other findings documenting frequent biases and inaccuracies in these emotional forecasts. When asked how we would feel if diagnosed with a serious illness, denied tenure, going on a vacation, or purchasing a desired item, there is a tendency to overpredict the intensity and duration of emotional responses. 3

Thanks to a generous award from the US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, colleagues Jill Bradley-Geist and Greg Ruark, several graduate students, and I conducted two field studies examining the accuracy and performance implications of affective forecasts in performance/work contexts. The basic study design was straightforward. First, individuals were asked to think of a series of work activities in which they would be participating during the following work week. Using an online survey, they provided descriptions of those activities along with ratings of how they would feel while engaging in the activities. They did so in reference to three negatively valenced states (anger/annoyance, anxiety/worry, and tiredness/fatigue) and two positively affect states (happiness/pleasure and relaxation/comfort). Then, immediately after engaging in each activity, participants reported their “felt” or experienced emotions during the activity. They also made several other ratings, such as perceived performance on the activity, the amount of interaction during the activity, and others.

The two studies provided similar conclusions. First, unlike most previous findings, affective forecasts were generally accurate here. Individuals were fairly accurate in predicting how they would feel while engaged in work activities. Worth noting is that some scholars suggest that the discrepancies found in most relevant research largely reflect methodological artifacts, not substantive biases/errors. Indeed, when people are asked how they will feel about a specific event and then report in reference to that specific event (versus when later asked to report how they feel in general, without reference to that event), accuracy is much higher – as was the case here.4

Second, both studies showed that errors of prediction were about equally as likely to reflect “feeling better” than expected as to reflect “feeling worse” than expected. That is, there was not a systematic tendency to forecast work as being more aversive or more enjoyable than it later turned out to be. There were errors in both directions, but they were about equal in frequency and magnitude.

Finally, with respect to performance, the two studies revealed that feeling “better” than predicted (higher scores on the positively valenced, and lower scores on the negatively valenced, emotions – relative to predicted ones) were associated with better self-rated performance.

We have presented this work at a conference and it is now under review at a journal. In the coming months, we are extending this research into specific job contexts, including police work. Please feel free to contact me with any thoughts.

 

*This research was supported by the U.S. Army Research Institute Grant #: VV911NF-16-1-0513. Any opinions, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of ARI or the government.

References

  1. Kaplan, S., Bradley, J.C., Luchman, J.N., & Haynes, D. (2009). On the role of positive

and negative affectivity in job performance: A meta-analytic investigation. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94, 162-176.

  1. DeWall, C. N., Baumeister, R. F., Chester, D. S., & Bushman, B. J. (2016). How often does

currently felt emotion predict social behavior and judgment? A meta-analytic test of two   theories. Emotion Review8, 136-143.

  1. Wilson, T. D., & Gilbert, D. T. (2003). Affective forecasting. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology35, 345-411.
  2. Levine, L. J., Lench, H. C., Kaplan, R. L., & Safer, M. A. (2012). Accuracy and artifact:

Reexamining the intensity bias in affective forecasting. Journal of Personality and Social   Psychology103, 584-605.

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October 16, 2018

Subjectivity, Self-Narratives and the History of Emotions Masterclass

A British Academy Rising Stars Engagement Event

Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, University of Sussex, 16-18 January 2019

Registration at:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/subjectivity-self-narratives-and-the-history-of-emotions-international-symposium-a-british-academy-tickets-50903210874

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October 12, 2018

History of Psychology invites submissions for a special issue on the history of emotions in the modern period.

The relatively new specialization of the history of the emotions has revealed that emotion, felt experience, and expression have played a key role in culture, society, and politics. In the history of science, however, interest in the emotions has been more muted. This special issue will focus on the exploration of emotion theory and practice in the human sciences in the modern period – roughly from the late 18thcentury to today.

This special issue will address the following themes, among others. Was there a particular historical moment in which interest in emotions in the sciences, broadly construed, increased? While some historians situate heightened study of the emotions in the sciences in the 1960s, others point to a surge in interest in emotions after World War II. But we can also go back to William James’s 1884 influential theory of emotion that stimulated intense debate; or to the 1910s, when Walter Cannon experimented on the physiological concomitants of emotion; or to the early 1920s, when unorthodox psychoanalysts Sandor Ferenczi and Otto Rank raised emotional understanding to a central place in psychoanalysis. More recently, studies in the new discipline of social neuroscience have contributed to the ever-growing literature on emotion and the brain.

Can we discover the roots of the academy’s recent turn to the emotions in older traditions that have not yet received their due? Might historical investigations shed light on contemporary debates on emotion including the existence, or not, of a set of universal, basic emotions, or whether emotion is primarily a bodily affect or a cognitive response?

As the study of emotion has not been confined to any one discipline, we welcome submissions on the history of psychology, psychotherapy, neuroscience, psychophysiology, social work or other relevant fields.

The submission deadline is March 1, 2019.

The main text of each manuscript, exclusive of figures, tables, references, or appendices, should not exceed 35 double-spaced pages (approximately 7,500 words). Initial inquiries regarding the special issue may be sent to the guest editor, Susan Lanzoni <smlanzoni@gmail.com>or the regular editor, Nadine Weidman <hop.editor@icloud.com>.

Papers should be submitted through the History of Psychology Manuscript Submission Portal with a cover letter indicating that the paper is to be considered for the special issue. Please see the Instructions to Authors information located on the History of Psychology website.

_____________________________________________________________________

October 2, 2018

Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

The Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE) was founded in 2011. Its mission is to provide leadership in worldwide humanities research into how societies have understood, experienced, expressed and performed emotions, and how this long history impacts on the modern world. CHE pursues these core questions within four main research programs: Meanings, Change, Performance and Shaping the Modern. The Centre’s initial focus was mainly on later medieval and early modern Europe, 1100–1800. It has since extended its enquiries to earlier and later historical periods, and to a global geographical range.

CHE’s national hub is at The University of Western Australia (UWA), with nodes at the Universities of Queensland, Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. Its Co-Directors are Professors Andrew Lynch and Susan Broomhall (UWA). Several new Australian nodes are in the process of affiliation, bringing further strengths, as the Centre enters a new phase of its existence. CHE actively welcomes involvement from new emotions researchers, together with its many former and existing Associate Investigators. It provides a stimulating environment and specialist training for postgraduates and early career researchers as part of its mission to foster the next generation of humanities researchers in Australia.

CHE has also worked closely with Partner Investigators from major institutions in the UK, Europe and Canada: Queen Mary University of London, the University of Southampton and Durham University (UK); Freie Universität Berlin (Germany) and Umeå University (Sweden), Université du Québec à Montréal and Western University (Canada). It has collaborated in organising academic events in Germany, Italy, Sweden, New Zealand, the UK, China, the USA, South Africa and Canada, and continues to welcome visiting emotions scholars from around the world.

CHE has created and fostered links between Australian humanities researchers and a broad set of industry partners, including performing arts institutions, art galleries and media organisations. It has developed innovative ways to relate and connect different research methods, and to maximise fruitful synergies between different disciplines. Examples of CHE’s work with industry include the exhibition Love: Art of Emotion 1400–1800 with the National Gallery of Victoria, the baroque pastiche opera Voyage to the Moon with Musica Viva and Victorian Opera, and historically informed performances at the New Fortune Theatre (UWA). The short video Old Emotions on the New Fortune Stage can be viewed here.

CHE also presents highly popular education and public outreach activities – lectures, workshops, seminars, podcasts, blogs, and school workshops. Through them we recover the history of emotions, and share it with the wider public, including high school students and teachers, to enrich personal lives and revitalise culture. Teacher Education Packs on the history of emotions for school students at all levels are publicly available. CHE also undertakes research on audience emotions through musical, operatic and theatrical events that utilise our understandings of historically informed performance practices from the past. A short video of CHE’s Opera Highlights can be viewed here. CHE research initiated and informed the prize-winning Zest Festival in the remote Western Australian town of Kalbarri – the site of the shipwreck of a Dutch VOC trading vessel, the Zuytdorp, in 1712 – connecting the local community with its Indigenous and European emotional histories. The short video Emotions and the Zest Festival can be viewed here.

In 2016, the Centre founded the international Society for the History of Emotions (SHE). SHE’s biannual refereed journal, Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS), now published by Brill, has become a venue for the latest international multidisciplinary research. EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures. It welcomes theoretically informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. It aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

The North American Chapter on the History of Emotion (NACHE), a subsidiary chapter of SHE, was launched in September 2018. Individual financial members of NACHE are considered to be members of SHE, and can subscribe to the EHCS journal for 2018 at this link. Institutions can subscribe to the journal via the Brill website.

The Society for the History of Emotions also runs its own major conferences, the next in Ottawa from 2–4 October 2019, and is associated with the continuing seminar series ‘Entangled Histories of Emotions in the Mediterranean World’, whose forthcoming meeting is in Malta in February 2019.

The ARC Centre for the History of Emotions looks forward to extending its collaborative reach and activities in the coming years. Intending visitors are invited to contact either of the CHE Co-Directors andrew.lynch@uwa.edu.au or susan.broomhall@uwa.edu.au. For further information about CHE please visit its website, or email: emotions@uwa.edu.au.

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September 28, 2018

Announcement and program for the international workshop on “The Multifaceted Relationship between Fear and Technology” our colleague Bettina Hitzer has organized with Alexander Gall (Munich), Martina Heßler (Hamburg), Karena Kalmbach (Eindhoven, NL), Anne Schmidt (MPI for Human Development, Berlin) and Andreas Spahn (Eindhoven, NL). It will take place from October 10 to 12, 2018, at our Institute in Berlin.

The workshop starts on October 10 at 6pm with a public keynote by Margaret Morris (University of Washington) on “Challenging Fears of Technology and Isolation”.

All relevant information on the registration procedure is also given in the program (p. 4). Program Multifaceted_Relationship

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September 27, 2018

Announcement and Call for Abstracts

Conference on Emotions and Emotion Concepts

in Bern, 29th November – 1st December 2018

It is our pleasure to announce and invite submissions for a three-day conference on Emotions and Emotion concepts which will take place on Thursday, 29th November until Saturday, 1st December, 2018 at the University of Bern, Switzerland.

Emotion concepts like happiness and fear are central to (a) communicate, understand and attribute emotions to ourselves and others, and (b) study emotions scientifically. Both philosophers and cognitive scientists rely on a mutual understanding of these concepts when conducting their research: Philosophers, on the one hand, need to make sure their conceptual analyses are informed by and in line with our common-sense understanding of emotion concepts. Cognitive scientists, on the other hand, rely on experimental subjects’ self-report of their emotions when trying to establish emotional correlates and effects in the mind and the body. However, it is not clear how the folk understanding of emotions and the scientific operationalization of emotion terms relate or should relate to each other.

The goal of this conference is to bring together philosophers, linguists, psychologist, and neuroscientists to discuss and develop some avenues for successfully tackling issues regarding:

(1) the nature of emotion,
(2) the structure of emotion concepts,
(3) how folk understanding and scientific operationalization of emotion terms (should) relate to each other.

Call for Abstracts

We invite contributions addressing these and related questions for presentation at the conference. We also invite submissions featuring empirical work or planned experimental studies on emotion concepts. There will be talks by the keynote speakers as well as several selected speakers from the Call for Abstracts.

If you have any questions about the conference, please send and email to rodrigo.diaz@philo.unibe.ch or kevin.reuter@philo.unibe.ch. (Attendance of the conference is free)

If you would like to present your work or ideas, please upload an abstract (max. 500 words) to our EasyChair website: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=eec18

Keynote Speakers:

Michael Brady (University of Glasgow)
Olga Pollatos (University of Ulm)
Jesse Prinz (City University New York)
Cristina Soriano (University of Geneva)
Fabrice Teroni (University of Geneva)

Christine Wilson-Mendenhall (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Important Dates

Abstracts Submission Deadline: 14th October 2018
Notification of Acceptance:  17th October 2018
Conference Dates   29th November – 1st December 2018

This workshop is financed by the Swiss National Foundation (IZSEZ0_183757).

Organization: 

Rodrigo Díaz (University of Bern)

Kevin Reuter (University of Bern)

Website:

https://sites.google.com/view/emotions-in-bern

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